Volume 1 - Issue 1

Scottish Universities Medical Journal Vol 1- Issue 1

Please find below the list of articles and their abstracts. The full journal is available for download below in PDF format an can be viewed online using ISSUU. Individual articles can be downloaded from the links provided.

Download SUMJ Dundee Vol1 - Issue 1 PDF

Vol 1 - Issue 1 Overview of Articles:

 

Licensed to Kill – The Impact of Legalising Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide on the Training of UK Medical Students

Bhajneek Grewal (5th Year MBChB) University of Dundee; Jennifer Harrison (FY2, Hairmyres Hospital East Kilbride) & Dr. David Jeffrey (Academic Mentor & Retired Palliative Care Consultant, University of Dundee)

Abstract:

There have been a number of attempts to legalise euthanasia and physician assisted suicide (PAS) in the UK over the past decade. The potential impact of legalising euthanasia and PAS in the UK on the training of medical students, the next generation of doctors, is examined in this discussion paper.

Cite this article as:

Grewal B, Harrison J & Jeffrey D (2012). Licensed to Kill - The Impact of Legalising Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide on the Training of UK Medical Students. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.6-13

Medical Students and peer support: a discussion based on findings from a BMSc research project

Jocelyn Dick (4th Year MBChB, BMSc) University of Dundee

Abstract:

Little evidence of support schemes available to students following examination failure exists. Peer assisted learning initiatives in medical education have been shown to increase students’ engagement with learning and optimise academic achievement. The role of peers in supporting medical students has not been formally explored at the University of Dundee, where this study was conducted.

Cite this article as:

Dick J (2012). Medical Students and peer support: a discussion based on findings from a BMSc research project. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.14-22

An analysis of factors contributing to poor outcomes in Cystic Fibrosis

Kirsten Murray (3rd Year MBChB) University of Dundee

Abstract:

Cystic fibrosis [CF] is one of the most frequently seen inherited conditions in Europeans and it affects 1 in 2381 births in the UK1,2. It is an autosomal recessive condition resulting from a mutation in the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene on chromosome 73. This affects the movement of chloride ions, leading to a disruption of sodium and water movement therefore secretions produced are abnormally thick. These thick secretions cause inflammation and affect the functioning of organs by damaging their cells. This article will review the factors and varaible known to worsen outcomes in CF patients.

Cite this article as:

Murray K (2012). An analysis of factors contributing to poor outcomes in Cystic Fibrosis. 1 (1). p.23-30

Primary Brain Tumours – Everything a Medical Students Needs to Know

Joseph Timmons (4th Year MBChB) University of Dundee

Abstract:

A brain tumour is an illness that inspires fear and foreboding in the general population. They can strike at any age and can often have devastating consequences. They are however relatively uncommon and perhaps this is why many undergraduate medical students do not have much in depth teaching in this area. In this review, we will consider all that an undergraduate student needs to know to have a good understanding of this complex and varied pathology.

Cite this article as:

Timmons J (2012). Primary Brain Tumours - Everything a Medical Student Needs to Know. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.31-37

Elective Surgical Management of Unruptured Aortic Abdominal Aneurysm – An Overview

Jennifer Ma (5th Year MBChB) University of Dundee

Abstract:

Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) represent a degenerative process of the abdominal aorta that is often attributed to atherosclerosis; however, the exact cause is not known. In American autopsy studies, the frequency rate of AAA ranges from 0.5‐3.2%. The frequency of rupture is 6.9 cases per 100,000 persons in Sweden, 4.8 cases per 100,000 persons in Finland, and 13 cases per 100,000 persons in the United Kingdom. Importantly, patients have a high mortality if an aneurysm ruptures so elective surgical management is of vital importance for the long‐term health of many patients.

Cite this article as:

Ma J (2012). Elective Surgical Management of Unruptured Aortic Abdominal Aneursym - An Overview. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.38-41

Efficacy and Safety of Deep Brain Stimulation on Tremor in MS Patients

Vishnu Jeyalan (5th Year MBChB) University of Dundee; Prof. Sam Eljamel (Consultant Neurosurgeon, NHS Tayside)

Abstract:

Tremor is a complication frequently associated with multiple sclerosis and can be severely disabling in up to 15% of these patients. Deep brain stimulation has been proven effective in other tremulous conditions though it’s efficacy and safety in multiple sclerosis patients is not well documented. A quantitative and qualitative review was done on all studies obtained in this literature that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria specified.

Deep brain stimulation is effective in the symptomatic relief of tremor in multiple sclerosis patients. The benefits gained depend on long-term stimulation and require patients to be compliant with regular follow-up. The subthalamic region has proved to be a more efficacious target as compared to the traditional ventral intermedius nucleus. Despite the good outcome, this procedure is associated with risk and has to be weighed against potential benefits.

Cite this article as:

Jeyalan V & Eljamel S (2012). Effiacy and Safety of Deep Brain Stimulation on Tremor. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.42-55

Approaches to Radiology
Radiology and Shortness of Breath

Dr. Nicola Schembri (Clinical Fellow in Medical Education & SpR in Radiology NHS Tayside)

Abstract:

This is my first in a series of articles aimed at improving medical students’ approach to interpretation of different imaging modalities. As medical students, and likewise also as fresh foundation doctors, despite probably adequate exposure to clinical images requested as part of the patient management pathway during ward‐based attachments, not many feel confident in their interpretation skills. Moreover though, two things that I find interesting is that medical students and junior doctors

  1. find it difficult to prioritise imaging requesting in the context of the clinical problem presented, and
  2. lack verbal fluency in describing their findings, no matter how barn‐door the findings are.

The essential point to make is that the aim is not to make mini‐radiologists, but to ensure that junior doctors can practice safely.
The key teaching points during this issue will focus on the following:

  • Tackling a core clinical problem and discussing its medical work‐up.
  • Discussion of the imaging work‐up emphasising on investigation prioritisation.

A self‐assessment section will supplement this, with a case study in future issues, to put knowledge acquired to practice.

Cite this article as:

Schembri N (2012). Approaches to Radiology - Radiology and Shortness of Breath. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.56-62

Glycaemic Control & Heart Failure Development

Importance of Health Promotion in the Diabetic Patient

Mohammed Farik Jabir (5th Year MBChB) University of Dundee & Prof. Chim Lang (Professor of Cardiology) University of Dundee

Abstract:

In diabetes, poor glycaemic control is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. The relationship between glycaemic control and chronic heart failure (CHF) is less well defined. There is controversy regarding the importance of glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes‐mellitus (T2DM) and CHF with recent evidence suggesting that tight glycaemic control may be associated with worse survival. This study examined the relationship between HbA1c and the risk of incident CHF and examine the relationship between HbA1c and outcome in T2DM with established CHF using a population database.

Cite this article as:

Jabir MF & Lang C (2012). Glycaemic Control & Heart Failure Development - Importance of Health Promotion in the Diabetic Patient. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.63-71

Clinical Anatomy Series
Issue 1 – Cardiac Anatomy

John W Kennedy (5th Year MBChB, BMSc) University of Dundee

Abstract:

The necessity for an appreciation of human anatomy has been integral to medical teaching for hundreds of years. Today, it still remains an integral component of the undergraduate curriculum, but with opinions being voiced over the adequacy of this teaching 1, and Royal Colleges noting a reduction in the anatomy knowledge base of applicants, this is clearly an area of concern. Indeed, there was a sevenfold increase in the number of medical claims made due to deficiencies in anatomy knowledge between 1995 and 2007. 2 Therefore, not only does a greater understanding of anatomical principles bring advantages to clinical practice, but also, it can make individuals stand out interview. This series of articles sets out to explore key anatomical structures placed in their clinical context, starting with cardiac anatomy.

Cite this article as:

Kennedy JW (2012). Clinical Anatomy Series - Cardiac Anatomy. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.76-80

Implications of Obesity on Anaesthetics

Hannah MacKenzie (4th Year MBChB) University of Dundee

Abstract:

As the proportion of obese patients within the general population rapidly increases, more obese patients are requiring anaesthesia. Obesity is associated with anatomical and physiological differences and co‐morbidities that impinge on the administration of anaesthesia. A surgical case, which could have been performed under a GA or a spinal anaesthetic is used as a basis of discussion. Various factors affecting airway choice, breathing problems, circulation and other issues are discussed.

Cite this article as:

MacKenzie H (2012). Implications of Obesity of Anaesthetics. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.81-88

Post‐Operative Nausea & Vomiting
Use of Anti‐Emetic Agents in Anaesthesia

Catriona Rother (4th Year MBChB, BMSc) University of Dundee

Abstract:

Post‐operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a recurrent problem in the field of anaesthetics. It is usually defined as nausea, retching or vomiting within 24 hours of surgery, and affects 20‐30% of patients. Although often considered merely an unpleasant side effect of general anaesthesia or surgery, PONV can result in many unwanted and potentially serious outcomes and increases healthcare expenditure considerably.

Cite this article as:

Rother C (2012). Post-Operative Nausea and Vomiting - Use of Anti-Emetic Agents in Anaesthesia. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.89-97

Acute Mountain Sickness

Tim Gomersall (3rd Year MBChB) University of Dundee

Abstract:

Tens of thousands of people are attracted to high altitude environments around the world every year either to experience a unique landscape or to revel in the satisfaction of a successful summit attempt. Doctors working in or around these locations will encounter altitude illness in a variety of forms. Indeed as mountaineering, skiing and rock climbing continue to be popular activities the prevalence of AMS remains at a high level.

Cite this article as:

Gomersall T (2012). Acute Mountain Sickness. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.98-103

The Accuracy of Fine Needle Aspiration at Identifying Thyroid Malignancy in Tayside

Rachael Allan (5th Year MBChB) University of Dundee

Abstract:

Thyroid lumps are common with as much as 8% of the adult population having a palpable lump and up to 70% having an incidental nodule found on ultrasound. Although most thyroid nodules are benign, a significant number are malignant and therefore need to be investigated thoroughly using fine needle aspiration +/‐ ultrasound.

( Supplementary Diagram: download)

Cite this article as:

Allan R (2012). Accuracy of Fine Needle Aspiration at Identifying Thyroid Malignancy in Tayside. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 1 (1). p.104-113