Volume 2 - Issue 1

Scottish Universities Medical Journal 2013 Volume 2- Issue 1

Please find below the list of articles and their abstracts. The full journal is available for download below in PDF format an can be viewed online using ISSUU. Individual articles can be downloaded from the links provided.

Download entire SUMJ Vol2 - Issue 1 as a PDF

 

 

Vol 2 - Issue 1 Overview of Articles:

An Ageing Society - Are Reformers Forgetting About Paediatrics?

Lloyd Steele (4th Year MBChB, BMSc) University of Sheffield

Abstract:

Change in the NHS is needed given drastic budget cuts and an increased demand for care. Although this change is evident in adult medicine, with many of the ideas contained in the 
Government response to the Stafford Hospital scandal already in train, paediatric care has 
attracted little attention despite facing similar problems. This essay explores these problems 
and the possible solutions. 

Cite this article as:

Steele L (2013). An Ageing Society - Are Reformers Forgetting About Paediatrics? Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 2 (1). p. 4-7
 

Sustainability and Accessibility of Healthcare in Times of Austerity: Improved Health Promotion and Transportation Remain Essential

Jacob Day (5th Year BM BCh; BA) University of Oxford, New College

Abstract:

The  NHS  aims  to  improve  the  health  of  the  entire  UK  population.  It  is  constrained  by 
government budgets and so must consider cost‐effectiveness. To maximise the benefit the 
NHS can provide we should focus on improving public health measures, particularly health 
promotion, and the accessibility of health services

Cite this article as:

Day J (2013). Sustainability and Accessibility of Healthcare in Times of Austerity: Improved Health Promotion and Transportation Remain Essential. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 2 (1). p. 8-12

The NHS in Recession - Embracing Technology and Structural Reform Alongside Patient Empowerment Is Key

Shreena Suchak (3rd year MBChB, BMSc) King's College London

Abstract:

The  NHS  is  a  symbol  of  pride  for  the  UK  with  a  fundamental  principle  to  provide 
comprehensive healthcare that is free at the point of access for all. Sustaining this caring 
concept is something that we should care about. However, in the current political and social 
climate real changes are required to allow the NHS to continue serving its fundamental 
purpose.  This  article  outlines  how  empowering  patients,  embracing  technology  and 
reviewing current NHS structures may be able to help the NHS move through this difficult 
period for the UK as a whole.  

Cite this article as:

Suchak S (2013). The NHS in Recession - Embracing Technology and Structural Reform Alongside Patient Empowerment Is Key. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 2 (1). p. 13-19

Person Centred Nutrition: Developing An Innovative Approach to Health Outcome Through Nutrition

Maria King (MSc Personalised Nutrition; Dip ION and BANT) Middlesex University London. Centre for Nutrition Education & Lifestyle Management

Abstract:

The  disease  centred  model  currently  used  by  conventional  medicine  has  resulted  in  the  NHS 
failing  to  keeping  pace  with  the  demands  placed  on  it.  Personal  Centred  Nutrition  offers  an 
alternative approach. 

Cite this article as:

King M (2013). Person Centred Nutrition: Developing An Innovative Approach To Health Outcome Through Nutrition. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 2 (1). p. 20-24

Developing Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Management - A Remedy for a NHS in a recession?

Cassie Philp (3rd Year MBChB) University of Nottingham

Abstract:

While use of health services is increasing, the resources available in the NHS remain limited. The health service will only remain sustainable by aiming to prevent ill health. This must be 
done for those already suffering from chronic diseases and by preventing the occurrence of 
disease from the outset.  

Cite this article as:

Philp C (2013). Developing Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Management - A Remedy for a NHS in a Recession?. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 2 (1). p. 25-30

Addressing Individual Lifestyle Choices - Education, Health Promotion and Patient Engagement

Robert Davies (1st year BSc(Hons) Dietetics) University of Plymouth

Abstract:

The NHS has a growing user‐demographic, and with rising demand, the NHS cannot function 
in the same way as people have come to know and expect. Innovative ways need to be 
employed to improve the accessibility and sustainability of health services. Lifestyle is a 
major contributor to the rise in NHS demand as there has been a move away from personal 
responsibility  and  accountability  to  a  culture  where  cure  is  better  than  prevention.  To 
improve health services, it would be advantageous to design better health campaigns that 
employ engaging behaviour models to instil long‐term behavioural changes with regards to 
lifestyle  behaviours  and  choices.  This  article  will  discuss  the  need  for  effective  health 
campaigns with an emphasis on behaviour models.

Cite this article as:

Davies R (2013). Addressing Individual Lifestyle Choices - Education, Health Promotion and Patient Engagement. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 2 (1). p. 31-36

The Findings of a Nationwide Audit - The Future of NHS Inflammatory Bowel Disease Services

Rebecca K Grant (1st year MBChB, MA (Hons), MSc) University of St Andrews

Abstract:

Cases of inflammatory bowel disease across the United Kingdom continue to rise.  This 
article  examines  the  opportunities  that  exist  in  different  care  settings  to  improve 
inflammatory bowel disease services, given the financial constraints currently faced by NHS. 

Cite this article as:

Grant RK (2013). The Findings of a Nationwide Audit - The Future of NHS Inflammatory Bowel Disease Services. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 2 (1). p. 37-41

Proposing a Trial in Home Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Programmes - A way to effectively tackle modifiable vascular risk factors?

Dr Neil Heron BSc (Med Sci) Hons, MBChB, DRCOG, Diploma in Mental Health (Distinction), 
DCH, M. ECOSEP,  DipSEM(UK&I), MRCGP, MPhil, MFSEM (UK and Ireland)

Abstract:

Stroke  is  a  major  cause  of  mortality  and  morbidity  that  may  be  prevented  by  early 
intervention following a transient ischaemic attack (TIA).  How to optimise such prevention, 
however, remains unknown. This paper therefore argues for a randomised controlled trial to 
assess the effectiveness of a home‐based cardiac rehabilitation programme, based on the 
‘Heart Manual’, begun within 2 weeks of a TIA, compared to usual care.  Potential benefits 
for patients could include improved well‐being and reduced risk of further vascular events, 
including stroke.

Cite this article as:

Heron N (2013). Proposing a Trial in Home Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Programmes - A way to effectively tackle modifiable vascular risk factors? Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 2 (1). p. 42-46

Application of Mental Health Activity Education Tool in Healthcare - Study Development

Gail Fulton (MSc Health Studies; BSc Hons Health and Sports Studies) University of the West of Scotland and University of Abertay Dundee

Abstract:

Despite  the  Government  providing  additional  funding  for  mental  health  services  and 
research,  it  is  grossly  less  than  other  physical  health  services.    Treatment  and  positive 
development  of  mental  health  issues  remain  the  biggest  challenge  for  The  Scottish 
Government.  A  connection  has  been  made  between  physical  and  mental  health  and  thus 
accessible  rehabilitation  programmes  may  benefit  patients  mentally  and  physically.    In  the 
last  two  decades,  a  number  of  studies,  clinical  and  non‐clinical  have  highlighted  the  positive 
affiliation  between  physical  activity/exercise  and  reducing  symptoms  of  depression. 
Depression  is  a  major  health  inequality  worldwide  affecting  121  million  people  from  all 
backgrounds.  It  has  many  affecting  factors  such  as  biological,  psychological  and  social 
implications  which  are  wide  ranging  from  mild  to  severe  depression.  Individuals  living  with 
chronic  physical  health  problems  can  go  on  to  develop  mental  health  problems  or  mental 
health problems can be aggravated by physical health conditions. 

Cite this article as:

Fulton G (2013). Application of Mental Health Physical Activity Education Tool in Healthcare – Study Development. Scottish Universities Medical Journal. 2 (1). p. 47-55